Flood Control Zones
Flood Control Zones

About the Flood Control Zones

Within the Flood Control District several Flood Control Zones have been created in areas with specific flooding problems. These Zones do not cover the entire District and are, for the most part, concentrated in the eastern urbanized corridor of Marin County. The vast majority of the land area of the County is not covered by any Flood Control Zone. The Zones can perform many functions, including the construction, operation and maintenance of levees, pumping stations, culverts and drainage ways, and the cleaning and maintenance of creeks. All major actions by the Zones require authorization by the Board of Supervisors of the Flood Control District.

The District as a whole has no source of funds. However, all Zones, with the exception of Zone 10, receive annual revenues from property tax and in some cases special taxes or fees. The amount of property taxes received by the Zone is based on the pre-Proposition 13 tax allocation and varies widely depending on property tax base of the Zone and pre-proposition 13 tax rates. All revenues in the District are collected through the Zones and therefore must be spent in the Zone providing funding.

The boundaries of the Flood Control and Water Conservation District are contiguous with those of the County of Marin and eight "zones" have been established to address specific watershed flooding problems. Each zone has an "Advisory Board" of 5 or 7 residents, who are appointed by the Board of Supervisors. These Boards review Zone budgets and master plans and advise the Board on these matters.

Video recordings of the Flood District proceedings are now available online.

  • Zone 1
    Novato
  • Zone 3
    Richardson Bay
  • Zone 4
    Bel Aire
  • Zone 5
    Stinson Beach
  • Zone 6
    San Rafael Meadows
  • Zone 7
    Santa Venetia
  • Zone 9
    Ross Valley
  • Zone 10
    Inverness

Zone Engineer: Joanna Dixon
Phone: (415) 473-7031
E-mail: JDixon@marincounty.org

Maintenance: Bene Da Silva 
Phone: (415) 473-6538
E-mail: BDaSilva@marincounty.org

Engineering projects: Roger Leventhal 
Phone: (415) 473-3249
E-mail: RLeventhal@marincounty.org

Zone Information

Zone 1 was formed in 1955 to address flooding issues in downtown Novato and surrounding areas and is overseen by a 5-member Advisory Board.

Zone 1 is the largest zone, by area, in Marin and covers over 45 square miles. It includes the City of Novato and portions of unincorporated County in Indian Valley, Bel Marin Keys, Green Point, Black Point, Loma Verde, and western Novato. There are 21,580 parcels within the Zone. 

The boundaries of the Zone and the Novato Creek Watershed closely align. Novato Creek is a substantial perennial stream that extends approximately 17 miles from San Pablo Bay to its headwaters at Stafford Lake, and about another 6 miles upstream of the Lake. Tributaries including Bowman Creek, Simmons Creek, Warner Creek and Arroyo Avichi, drain the subwatersheds. 

The Zone work program includes regular servicing of 8 pumps at 4 pump stations, maintenance of 9 miles of flood protection levees, maintenance of tidegates and trash racks, and an annual vegetation maintenance program along 15 miles of creeks. In addition, Zone 1 periodically removes accumulated sediment from lower Novato Creek, Warner Creek and Arroyo Avichi to improve flow conveyance.

 

Scott McMorrow - Zone Engineer
Telephone No. (415) 473-2918
E-mail: SMcmorrow@marincounty.org

Zone Information

Zone 3 was formed in 1956 to address creek and tidal flooding adjacent to Richardson Bay and is overseen by a 7-member Advisory Board.

Zone 3 covers over 13 square miles, including the City of Mill Valley and numerous unincorporated communities including Marin City, Alto, Sutton Manor, Almonte, Tamalpais Valley, Homestead Valley, and portions of Strawberry Point.  There are 12,560 parcels in the Zone.

The boundaries of the Zone include the subwatersheds of Arroyo Corte Madera del Presidio, Warner Creek, and Coyote Creek, all of which drain to Richardson Bay.

The Zone 3 work program includes regular servicing of 13 pumps at 5 pump stations, maintenance of 1.3 miles of flood protection levees, maintenance of tidegates and trash racks, and an annual vegetation maintenance program along 3 miles of creek. In addition, Zone 3 periodically dredges lower Coyote Creek to remove accumulated sediment in the concrete chancel to improve flow conveyance.

Scott McMorrow - Zone Engineer
Telephone No. (415) 473-2918
E-mail: SMcmorrow@marincounty.org

Zone Information

Zone 4 was created in 1957 to alleviate chronic flooding in Bel Aire and adjacent undeveloped lands.  The boundaries of the zone were later amended to include Strawberry Circle.  It is overseen by a 5-member Advisory Board.

Zone 4 is small, covering only 0.85 square miles and includes parts of the Town of Tiburon and unincorporated Bel Aire and Strawberry Circle. There are 850 parcels in the Zone.

The boundaries of the Zone include the subwatersheds of East and west Creeks and Salt Works Canal, all of which drain to Richardson Bay.

The Zone 4 work program includes regular servicing of 8 pumps at 3 pump stations, maintenance of 0.15 miles of flood protection levees, maintenance of tidegates and trash racks, and an annual vegetation maintenance program along 0.9 mile of creek.

Jon Liang - Zone Engineer
Telephone No. (415) 473-6215
Email: JLiang@marincounty.org

Zone Information

Zone 5 was created in 1961 to address creek and tidal flooding in Stinson Beach. It is overseen by a 5-member Advisory Board.

It is small, covering 2.28 square miles of entirely unincorporated lands in the community of Stinson Beach. There are 921 parcels in the Zone. The boundaries of the Zone and the Easkoot Creek Watershed closely align. The tributaries Fitzhenry, White Rock, and Black Rock Creeks join Easkoot Creek before it flows through Stinson Beach and out to the Pacific Ocean. 

Zone does not have pump stations or levees; the Zone 5 work program is limited to an annual vegetation maintenance program along 0.25 miles of creek and periodic maintenance of a sediment basin. In the past, the Zone has periodically dredged Easkoot Creek, as an active slide on Mt. Tamalpais releases quantities of hillside material that fills the creek. Current Zone funding is no longer sufficient to do this work.

Jon Liang - Zone Engineer
Telephone No. (415) 473-6215
Email: JLiang@marincounty.org

Zone Information

Zone 6 was created in the 1960’s to address frequent flooding in the low-lying neighborhood just west of Highway 101 across from the County Civic Center.  It is overseen by a 5-member Advisory Board.

Zone 6 is the County’s smallest flood control zone, covering only 0.16 square mile entirely within the City of San Rafael. The neighborhood was unincorporated when the Zone was established, but was annexed by City of San Rafael which now owns and maintains the Zone’s drainage easements. There are 440 parcels in the Zone. In the early 2000s, construction of a new subdivision rerouted stormwater infrastructure around the community, eliminating a significant cause of flooding in the zone.

The Zone occupies a very small part of the Gallinas Creek Watershed. 

The Zone 6 work program includes an annual vegetation maintenance program along 0.75 mile of creek.

Jon Liang - Zone Engineer
Telephone No. (415) 473-6215
Email: JLiang@marincounty.org

Zone 7 was created in 1962 to address creek and tidal flooding within the low-lying unincorporated community of Santa Venetia. It is overseen by a 5-member Advisory Board.

Zone 7 is the second-smallest flood control zone in the county and covers 0.42 square miles in entirely unincorporated lands in the community of Santa Venetia. There are 890 parcels in the Zone.

The Zone occupies a small part of the lower Gallinas Creek Watershed. Santa Venetia was one of the first developments in Marin County to be constructed on fill over bay mud and occurred in an era before the County had the authority to regulate or control development.  Due to the low initial elevation of the fill and the compressible nature of the underlying bay mud, the area has subsided and is now below the high tide level.  

The Zone 7 work program includes regular servicing of 14 pumps at 5 pump stations, maintenance of 5 portable pumps, maintenance of 1.9 miles of flood protection levees, maintenance of tidegates and trash racks, and an annual vegetation maintenance program along 0.85 mile of creek.

Ross Valley Flood Protection and Watershed Program

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Felix Meneau - Zone Engineer
Telephone No. (415) 473-3223
Email: FMeneau@marincounty.org

Zone 9 was established in 1966 to act as a sponsoring agency for a major U.S. Army Corps of Engineers flood control project on Corte Madera Creek.  The Zone boundary was amended In January 2007 to include all territories within the incorporated areas of the towns of San Anselmo and Fairfax.  This change was undertaken in response to the flood of December 31, 2005 and the subsequent creation of the Ross Valley Flood Control and Watershed program.  

Zone 9 covers over 29 square miles, including the towns of Fairfax, San Anselmo, Ross and Larkspur as well as the unincorporated communities of San Anselmo, Fairfax, Kentfield, and Greenbrae. There are 21,095 parcels in the Zone.

The boundaries of the Zone and the Corte Madera Creek Watershed closely align. Corte Madera Creek is a substantial perennial stream. Tributaries that join the mainstem before it flows into San Francisco Bay include Fairfax, San Anselmo, Ross, Sleepy Hollow, Kittle, and Larkspur Creeks. 

The Zone 9 work program includes regular maintenance of 1 mile of flood protection levees, maintenance of the USACE concrete channel, maintenance of tidegates and trash racks, and an annual vegetation maintenance program along 0.6 mile of creek. Zone 9 periodically dredges lower Corte Madera Creek to remove accumulated sediment and to improve flow conveyance.

Jon Liang - Zone Engineer
Telephone No. (415) 473-6215
Email: JLiang@marincounty.org

Zone Information

Zone 10 was formed in 1982 to address impacts of the large January storm on the west shore of Tomales Bay and the east flank of the Inverness Ridge. The Zone is largely dormant but can be revived for the next large storm.  There is not an operating Advisory Board at this time.

Limited creek maintenance is completed on an as-needed basis.